Address

World Peace Dome

VishwaRaj baug, Loni Kalbhor, Solapur Highway, Near Bharat Petrol Pump , Loni Kalbhor Railway station, Pune - 412201

Maharashtra​

www.worldpeacedome.org

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MAHATMA GANDHI
- A Great Messenger of Peace -
Celebration of Birth Anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi
A Tribute by MIT-WPU

Global Peace


World peace is defined as an ideal of freedom, peace, and happiness among and within all nations and/or people. It generally includes an idea of planetary non-violence by which nations willingly cooperate, either voluntarily or by virtue of a system of governance that prevents warfare. Today, peace has predominantly become political work towards settlement of issues between the nations through military involvement, cessation of arms and weapons and dialogue on less-violent, civilian matters. Peace has also included some humanitarian efforts that stretch its helping hands to the calamity-hit regions in the world. World peace is defined as an ideal of freedom, peace, and happiness among and within all nations and/or people. It generally includes an idea of planetary non-violence by which nations willingly cooperate, either voluntarily or by virtue of a system of governance that prevents warfare. Today, peace has predominantly become political work towards settlement of issues between the nations through military involvement, cessation of arms and weapons and dialogue on less-violent, civilian matters. Peace has also included some humanitarian efforts that stretch its helping hands to the calamity-hit regions in the world.


Today, governments worldwide have not used much of democratic means to maintain peace, rather bound to display their military character and power to settle down issues that disturbed peace. They often fail to realize the fact that violence erupts at the social level, commutes to the political level and seeking a resolution finally at the military level. Diplomatic efforts have become more so customary and ineffective in front of military powers. The economic status of the nations too plays a crucial role in determining the degree of success of any peace initiative.


Gandhi is not seen in this platform of world peace. His ideologies remain neglected at the global forum and are considered as a tonic for social and cultural development only. As he is known as the Father of the nation politically, economically his dictum stands as a medicine merely for building local economy. Global communities have not come and thought of Gandhi as a "solution provider", "conflict breaker" or even as a peace activist. World peace continues to be at the hands of world powers that use violence and warfare. Indeed the situation is so grim that even a global peace campaigner is quite plausibly to localize and narrow down himself and his campaign giving in to the pressures and rigid policies of the governments.


Today political leaders take chances of peace in their hands and play a role in making or breaking the nations. Nations engage in dialogue and negotiations to settle down their ethnic problems and border issues. Political, diplomatic and media powers contribute their part to facilitate this peace process but hatred and hostilities dominate the situation as peace is not achieved at the individual levels. World governments fail to identify the key personals and power-centers that govern the war frameworks and conflict centers. Dialogues are meant for mutual understanding, not for nurturing hatred and obscuring manipulations. They shall not give the slightest chance for eruption of violence or war by both the military and the militant or rebel groups. Misrepresentation and shallow understanding of conflicts between the groups within a country and between the countries rather complicates the situation. Changing political conditions shall not set hurdles in the ongoing conflict resolution process.


Gandhi said, "If we have no charity, and no tolerance, we shall never settle our differences amicably and must therefore always submit to the arbitration of a third party." Many of today's conflict management techniques and resolution process have a clear shadow of what and how Gandhi had seen inter-national issues in his times. A war-hunger nation has nothing in this world whilst a starving nation needs every kind of help from the world. A nation endangering peace in the world has no security for itself.


Peace can never be achieved by one-dimensional and unilateral talks or efforts. It has numerous facets of social, ethnical, religious and political elements and copious ways to deal with them to bring and stabilize worsened situations under control. The true character of a conflict must be identified and may perhaps be attributed any of those hidden elements. Gandhi's perception of bringing peace and resolving conflict had such a diversified point of interest every time when he insisted on taking fast to bring hostile situation under control. Whether there is a riot in the eastern Bengal or unrest in the north-western part of India, peace lived in his soul consciously demanding him to take on fast even if he resides in another corner of the country. Thus, peace becomes universal and eternal.
In the following paragraphs, his views on peace, as he wrote or said on various occasions when violence and warfare prevailed over nonviolence and peace in the world.


Today, governments worldwide have not used much of democratic means to maintain peace, rather bound to display their military character and power to settle down issues that disturbed peace.  They often fail to realize the fact that violence erupts at the social level, commutes to the political level and seeking a resolution finally at the military level. Diplomatic efforts have become more so customary and ineffective in front of military powers. The economic status of the nations too plays a crucial role in determining the degree of success of any peace initiative.


Gandhi is not seen in this platform of world peace. His ideologies remain neglected at the global forum and are considered as a tonic for social and cultural development only. As he is known as the Father of the nation politically, economically his dictum stands as a medicine merely for building local economy. Global communities have not come and thought of Gandhi as a “solution provider”, “conflict breaker” or even as a peace activist. World peace continues to be at the hands of world powers that use violence and warfare. Indeed the situation is so grim that even a global peace campaigner is quite plausibly to localize and narrow down himself and his campaign giving in to the pressures and rigid policies of the governments.


Today political leaders take chances of peace in their hands and play a role in making or breaking the nations. Nations engage in dialogue and negotiations to settle down their ethnic problems and border issues. Political, diplomatic and media powers contribute their part to facilitate this peace process but hatred and hostilities dominate the situation as peace is not achieved at the individual levels. World governments fail to identify the key personals and power-centers that govern the war frameworks and conflict centers. Dialogues are meant for mutual understanding, not for nurturing hatred and obscuring manipulations. They shall not give the slightest chance for eruption of violence or war by both the military and the militant or rebel groups. Misrepresentation and shallow understanding of conflicts between the groups within a country and between the countries rather complicates the situation. Changing political conditions shall not set hurdles in the ongoing conflict resolution process.


Gandhi said, “If we have no charity, and no tolerance, we shall never settle our differences amicably and must therefore always submit to the arbitration of a third party.” Many of today’s conflict management techniques and resolution process have a clear shadow of what and how Gandhi had seen inter-national issues in his times. A war-hunger nation has nothing in this world whilst a starving nation needs every kind of help from the world. A nation endangering peace in the world has no security for itself.


Peace can never be achieved by one-dimensional and unilateral talks or efforts. It has numerous facets of social, ethnical, religious and political elements and copious ways to deal with them to bring and stabilize worsened situations under control. The true character of a conflict must be identified and may perhaps be attributed any of those hidden elements. Gandhi’s perception of bringing peace and resolving conflict had such a diversified point of interest every time when he insisted on taking fast to bring hostile situation under control. Whether there is a riot in the eastern Bengal or unrest in the north-western part of India, peace lived in his soul consciously demanding him to take on fast even if he resides in another corner of the country. Thus, peace becomes universal and eternal.
In the following paragraphs, his views on peace, as he wrote or said on various occasions when violence and warfare prevailed over nonviolence and peace in the world.

References
World Peace, Wiki
Epigrams from Gandhiji, http://mkgandhi.org

Raghupati Raghav Raja Ram 
Patita Pavan Sitaram 

Sitaram, Sitaram, 
Bhaj Pyare Mana Sitaram 
Raghupati Raghav Raja Ram 
Patita Pavan Sitaram 


Ishwar Allah Tero Nam, 
Sabako Sanmati De Bhagawan 
Raghupati Raghav Raja Ram 
Patita Pavan Sitaram 


Mukhmen Tulsi Ghatamen Ram, 
Jab Bolo Tab Sitaram 
Raghupati Raghav Raja Ram 
Patita Pavan Sitaram 


Hathose Karo Gharka Kam, 
Mukhase Bolo Sitaram 
Raghupati Raghav Raja Ram 
Patita Pavan Sitaram 


Kaushalyaka Vhala Ram, 
Dashrathjika Pyara Ram 
Raghupati Raghav Raja Ram 
Patita Pavan Sitaram 


Bansivala Hay Ghanshyam, 
Dhanushya Dhari Sitaram 
Raghupati Raghav Raja Ram 
Patita Pavan Sitaram